Heather Gunn heatherelgunn@yahoo.ca Female, [1101] 17 [1055] [1081] [1082] [1173]  
 

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Residencies and Colonies Available

Please see our professional artist section to find out more about our residency and colony opportunities at Ross Creek!

Camps

From day camps for the youngest kids, to advanced programs in all the arts for teens, to our premiere Dance Summer Dance program, Ross Creek is home to incredible camps combining creativity and traditional summer camp, on a beautiful site overlooking the Bay of Fundy. Click here to find out more. 

The Repository of Wonders – Susan Malmstrom and Elizabeth Kenneday

July 1 to August 16
It was with great pleasure that we extended the invitation to partake of the marvels proffered within an amazing cabinet of curiosities: The Repository of Wonders.  The repository was part of an ongoing project involving an inherited collection of artifacts and objects that once belonged to the (long-defunct) New Museum of the Pacific, a “dime museum” located in Piedmont, California, owned and operated by Dr. Mycenae T. Consonant.  Remnants of the collection were cleaned and repaired as necessary, and now reside in The Repository of Wonders, a traveling exhibition that is maintained under the auspices of Chief Curator Susan Malmstrom, with assistance from Photographic Specialist/Assistant Curator Elizabeth Kenneday. www.repositoryofwonders.org

 

Only the Horses – Jessie Babin

January – June 2014
Born in Dalhousie New Brunswick, Jessie’s mediums of choice include graphite, coloured pencils, charcoal and ink. In this exhibit, her drawings attained a high degree of finish and detail, reinforcing the connection to both graphic design and illustration. Her work is rooted in her rural environment and beautifully explores her surroundings.

Black Nance – Chris Boyne

November 1 – December 20, 2013
A memory turned into magical experience in sculpture, video and 2 dimensional drawings. “black nance is a project based in history and story. For the project, I made a traditional pond boat with a hull shaped of wood, a heavy metal keel and functional rigging that allows the model to sail autonomously. Black Nance was the name of the first Tancook Schooner built by Amos Stevens of Tancook, Nova Scotia. The model I built is based loosely on that boat. The hull was shaped with similar lines as the original but the style of rigging and shape of the keel are different. The black nance I built does not attempt to faithfully replicate the original but the two boats do exist in the same place—the original was the first of its kind and, within my practice, mine is as well.” – Chris Boyne

Small Realm – Elizabeth Root Blackmer

September 15 – October 22, 2013
With her keen eye and extraordinary vision, Elizabeth Blackmer’s photographs take the viewer on a journey that shows the exotic and dramatic in the plant and insect life that surrounds us every day. Through her microphotography, Elizabeth’s work celebrates the dynamic and infinite world right under our fingertips and invites us to see our world in a new way. Originally from the US, Elizabeth lived in Horton Landing for many years while working as a professor at Acadia. She now resides in Maine.

Hortus Siccus – Ilaria Facchin

July 1 – August 20, 2013

Italian artist Ilaria Facchin explored her connection to the Nova Scotia landscape in a quiet, poetic show of drawn images on white paper that were whispers of insect and plant life. The show was the product of Facchin’s two-month stay as artist in residence. She took the surrounding fields and flowers and, nearby, a rocky beach as inspiration. She also created a multimedia piece in collaboration with Jacinte Armstrong and Tim Reed, a mediation in video of Dance and music.

 

DYS|functionality, Group Ceramic Show

June, 2013

From Chia trees to ceramic mountains, from a forest of potted plants to vibrant funnel sculptures, we  showcase works based in ceramics that are not one or the other, somewhere in between, that read as a functional object but are abstracted, skewed, shrunken, enlarged, exaggerated or perhaps look nothing like a functional object yet have hidden purpose. The artists  obscure the functionality of the often domestic nature of ceramics and crafts by presenting works by contemporary artists that are unbounded by these guidelines and who are exploring new (dys)functionalities in their work.

Ric Stultz – Colour Choices

April 7 – May 29

Wisconsin artist Ric Stultz collects inspiration from the world around him and mixes it up with a generous assortment of rainbow colours and expressive line work. His gloriously bright, engaging and exciting images  are collected, exhibited and published around the world and he is a NASA featured artist. He also connects art and design, with his imagery used in products such as cell phone cases.

Tazeen Qayyum – Inventory

January 13 – February 20, 2013

Qayyum borrowed the language of entomology, and mimic insect museum displays, using display cases, real entomology pins and labels, to explore how categories and classifications, used in archiving practices, are similar to political propaganda. Tazeen Qayyum is a contemporary miniature painter who received her BFA in Visual Arts from the National College of Arts Lahore, Pakistan in 1996. Her work has been shown internationally in both solo and group exhibitions, and she has  created several performance based artworks including  collaborative multidisciplinary projects in Canada and abroad.

Rachael Shrum – Inventory

November 1 – December 20, 2012

The series consists of two parts: 8 large photographs which are “secret” spaces containing many of Rachael Shrum‘s possessions and 23 smaller images of the items found within each space.  This photo project is an inventory of her belongings.  To a stranger’s eyes these private storage vessels would not stand out amongst her other belongings.  For this reason she chose to print large and use a certain lighting technique magnifying the objects and bringing them to the centre of attention.

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